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The Barakat Gallery Hong Kong

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Located in the world famous antique district, on Hollywood Road in Sheung Wan, Barakat Gallery Hong Kong neighbors with the historical Man Mo Temple, Liang Yi Museum and a wide array of Chinese antique shops.

Pakistan Art Review (PAR) is the first magazine on art in Pakistan online. We provide extensive information on art and artists in Pakistan.

We also address Pakistanis settled in foreign countries as well as the foreign audience who are interested in paintings and other forms of visual art from Pakistan.

Vol #1018 | Issue #0118 Thursday March 05, 2018
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Selections from the Chinese Art Collection

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Some of the most beautiful works of Chinese art were excavated from tombs, and this sculpture of a camel and rider is a gorgeous example of the refined artistry of works that were never meant to be seen by the living. Thick tufts of furry hair cover the camel along his head, neck, and front knees. The camel holds his mouth wide open, exposing his teeth and the undulating tail gracefully rises in the rear. The distinct physiognomy of the removable rider, featuring deep-set squinting eyes and fleshy cheeks, reveals that he is of foreign descent, most likely from Central Asia.

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Some of the most beautiful works of Chinese art were excavated from tombs, and this sculpture of a camel and rider is a gorgeous example of the refined artistry of works that were never meant to be seen by the living. Thick tufts of furry hair cover the camel along his head, neck, and front knees. The camel holds his mouth wide open, exposing his teeth and the undulating tail gracefully rises in the rear. The distinct physiognomy of the removable rider, featuring deep-set squinting eyes and fleshy cheeks, reveals that he is of foreign descent, most likely from Central Asia.

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This astonishing piece is a dragonfish, a symbol of good luck, prosperity and success in Chinese society. Its remarkable features are unrelated to those of the taxonomically-valid "dragon-fish", and instead reflect an agglomeration of features in the same way that "foo dogs" resemble lions; it possesses a fusion of dragon-like and leonine characteristics, fused into an arresting whole and painted in vivid polychrome colours.

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Pair of playful children (Chin. wa-wa) standing in their gowns and trowsers loosely worn, one holding a small finger citron that stands for plenty, the other a lidded bottle, perhaps reminiscent of a Buddhist ailment jar. Traces of the original pigments remain between the folds of the clothing and on the faces. Wa-wa, children at play, was a theme usually associated with prosperity and joyfulness and often appeared in traditional paintings, lacquers and ceramics from the Ming period onwards. The two figures here illustrated are recognisable by their young hairstyle, one having the hair tied up into two lateral knobs, the other with two bows on the sides, above the ears.

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This stunning piece was excavated from the 'Sichuan Province' It is an earthenware green-glazed model of a horse, head held high and modeled with flat cheeks, ears pricked and alert, eyes wide and bulging, nostrils flaring, open mouth with thick lips curled well back as if loudly neighing and revealing the teeth. The mane is closely cropped and descends to the base of the neck. The main body is finely proportioned and modeled; semi-circular lines moulded at the shoulders and rump are used to enhance the feeling of inactivity, while the graceful legs have their musculature similarly defined with vertical lines, giving them definition above the hooves. The tail is short and separately moulded. Traces of the original green glaze are still visible on the surface of the horse.

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This sculpture of a Guanyin is unusually posed, almost lounging back on the right arm against a low seat while casually resting the left arm on the right knee, The right leg is pressed down, parallel with the floor. This contrasts with the haughty facial expression and regal mien of the upper body. The Guanyin is dressed in long, flowing robes that hang in pleats below the level of the figure's base, as well as an additional garment (possibly a dhoti) tied off around the waist. The hands protrude rather languidly from long sleeves, and are arranged in meditative positions. The figure is also wearing an ornate necklace. The face is exquisitely carved and conveys a decidedly aristocratic expression, with half-closed eyes beneath elevated eyebrows, a small, pursed mouth and rounded cheeks.

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Beautifully modeled white marble lion sitting on a double lotus throne. The lion is not an indigenous animal to China, but it was introduced later in connection with Buddhism, figuring as the defender of law and protector of buildings. It is an emblem of valor and energy that were considered essential to the cultivation of wisdom. The Chinese lion, despite its big eyes and fierce countenance, is not treated as the supreme predatory animal--a position, rather, held by the tiger which flourishes in the northern hinterland and evokes fear in the hearts and imagination of Chinese people.

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This particular piece is remarkable for its facial morphology, which may be designed to imply that he is not Chinese, and is instead a native of Central Asia towards the fringes of the Tang imperial territories. It must be remembered that Chinese physiognomy - rather high cheekbones, narrow eyes with epicanthic folds, dark hair and delicate features - is usually exaggerated in their funerary arts. There is no possibility that this figure depicts someone of Chinese origin. The face is very pale, with an extremely broad chin, a broad nose with widely-spaced nostrils. The eyes are very large and round, with pale irises, and a similarly broad and down-turned mouth. The brows are marked, the ears protuberant and the cheekbones lower than might be expected for the depiction of a Chinese character.

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